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2012 Contenders

Intel: Paul Otellini (CEO)

Posted by on Dec 31, 2012 in 2012 contender | 0 comments

Why this is a big quit: Intel, the world’s largest personal computer “brain” maker, is going to lose its CEO, Paul Otellini. He announced his early retirement in November after serving as CEO for almost 8 years. He joined the company fresh out of college in 1974, when computers where the size of manatees. During his nearly 40-year tenure of this 45-year old organization, he contributed to its global domination over AMD (What’s inside?). Staff and Wall Street consistently perceived Otellini as a strong, firm, and respected leader. Why...

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Chicago Teachers Union

Posted by on Dec 31, 2012 in 2012 contender | 0 comments

Why this is a big quit: On September 10, Chicago, the third largest US school district, had its first teachers strike in 25 years. 350,000 students were out of school, and most of their parents left work to take care of their children.  The 7-day walkout originated from the national debate over how to improve failing schools. The tension finally broke and the strike suspended after the two parties compromised on a three-year contract. This strike demonstrated the unity of teachers, and may indicate the return of labor unions in the United...

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Sunoco: Lynn Elsenhans (CEO & Chairperson)

Posted by on Dec 31, 2012 in 2012 contender | 0 comments

Why this is a big quit: After spending almost four years as the CEO transforming Sunoco’s business structure from refining and manufacturing into building oil pipelines and fuel retailing, Lynn Elsenhans ran out of steam in February 2012. Elsenhans took over in 2008 and she was named #10 Most Powerful Women by Forbes in the following year. One reason being she was the first woman to lead a major oil company in the typically male dominated industry. Elsenhans was willing to take the challenge and refocus Sunoco when the fuel demand plummeted...

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Microsoft: Steven Sinofsky (President of Windows Division)

Posted by on Dec 31, 2012 in 2012 contender | 0 comments

Why this is a big quit: Within weeks after throwing Microsoft’s biggest Hail Mary pass that is Windows 8, Steven Sinofsky, Microsoft’s Windows leader for three years, walked off the field. He joined the company as a software design engineer and ended his 23-year tenure in November. After the turmoil of Windows Vista, Sinofsky took over and successfully delivered Windows 7 on time and restored customer loyalty and trust. In addition to Windows 8, marketed as the “new era” of desktop and mobile computing, Sinofsky led development of Surface,...

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WellPoint: Angela Braly (CEO & President)

Posted by on Dec 31, 2012 in 2012 contender | 0 comments

Why this is a big quit: WellPoint is the second largest U.S. health insurer. With the ongoing national debate over the health insurance changes, Angela Braly’s departure can potentially distract this major health care organization.  Ms. Braly, with WellPoint since 1999, served several different important positions. As Executive Vice president and Chief Public Affairs Officer, prior to becoming the CEO in 2007, she proved her fitness during the acquisition of WellChoice in 2005. Why it’s not as big as our Top 10: Under Ms. Braly’s leadership,...

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T-mobile USA: Philipp Humm (CEO)

Posted by on Dec 31, 2012 in 2012 contender | 0 comments

Why this is a big quit: The German born CEO, Philipp Humm, said “auf wiedersehen” to roaming charges and T-mobile USA and returned to his family in Europe. His sudden resignation caused much static in the industry as he will join European rival mobile provider Vodafone. Humm was placed as the CEO in 2010 to expand T-mobile USA market share. Why it’s not as big as our Top 10: During his tenure, T-mobile bled customers as the only national wireless company that could not sprechen sie iPhone. To minimize the iDamage, Humm initiated a merger with...

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Big Lots: Steven Fishman (CEO)

Posted by on Dec 31, 2012 in 2012 contender | 0 comments

Why this is a big quit: Steven Fishman was Big Lots CEO for nearly 8 years. Big Lots made a tremendous effort in that time to become a consistently profitable company. However, Mr. Fishman’s departure means Big Lots is losing its big guy without an immediate successor to replace him. Another reason this is a big quit is that Big Lots has received Wall Street attention earlier this year because Mr. Fisher sold 10 million stocks in March yet he reported the sales of the company have slowed in April during the first-quarter sales report....

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NY Knicks: Mike D’Antoni (Coach)

Posted by on Dec 31, 2012 in 2012 contender | 0 comments

Why this is a big quit: D’Antoni is an experienced coach who served several teams in NBA during his career. Before joining NY Knicks in 2008, he once won the NBA Coach of the Year award. A 10-5 run during the “Linsanity” insanity catapulted him and the team into the spotlight and talk of a championship run. However, after a winless six March games, D’Antoni and the 18/24 Knicks seemed to have conflicting visions of the club’s future. D’Antoni made the decision to resign before the season ended amid continued questions about the clash between...

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Research in Motion – BlackBerry: Mike Lazaridis and Jim Balsillie (Co-CEOs & Co-Founders)

Posted by on Dec 31, 2012 in 2012 contender | 0 comments

Why this is a big quit: Jim Balsillie and Mike Lazaridis founded the BlackBerry builders and were the giants in the smartphone world in 2007. Five years later, they quit juicing. Even though Balsillie and Lazaridis left because of poor performance and BlackBerry’s increasing loss of market share, Balsillie and Lazaridis symbolized the innovators  of the smartphone era and represent the backbone of Research in Motion. Why it’s not as big as our Top 10: Lazaridis and Balsillie’s overconfidence and underestimation (if not disregard) of...

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Urban Outfitters: Glen Senk (CEO)

Posted by on Dec 31, 2012 in 2012 contender | 0 comments

Why this is a big quit: Urban Outfitters is the parent company of several popular clothing brands including Anthropologie and Free People. Senk joined the company in 1994 when Anthropolgie was only a single-store prototype. His creativity, passion, and effort have led the company to grow and develop to its current stage. Urban Outfitters shares tumbled 14% after the news broke. As the economy is slowly recuperating, Senk’s departure means a critical loss of top core talent that challenges the recovery of Urban Outfitters. Why it’s not as big...

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